Side-by-Side Assembly Types

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Automatic Build Type

While reading the following please keep in mind that Manifest Maker can build both a private assembly and one or more isolated applications in one step (as long as all applications are in the same directory). This is the recommended way to build manifests for applications being packaged for corporate deployment.

To perform an automatic build choose Automatic build type in the Project Properties dialog in Manifest Maker.

Isolated Application

Isolated applications are applications installed with manifests so that they do not rely on COM component registration in the Windows registry or on Windows or System32 directories to contain DLLs the applications need.

To create an Isolated Application choose Application Manifest build type in the Project Properties dialog in Manifest Maker.

For detailed description see MSDN topic Isolated Applications.

Private Assemblies

A private assembly is a collection of files described by a manifest including that manifest. Private assemblies must be deployed in a properly named subdirectory of the application directory. Manifest Maker builds one private assembly during an automated build. It may be advantageous to build more private assemblies to group related files in the same assembly. This is also the preferred way to package DLLs that will be distributed using MSI merge modules. To use a private assembly, the application manifest must explicitly reference it.

Manifest Maker has a unique feature allowing you to build a library of private assemblies and use them in your projects without actually copying the assembly files. This feature is included to help with distribution of private assemblies as merge modules. See Planning Corporate Deployment for more details.

To create a Private Assembly choose Private Assembly build type in the Project Properties dialog in Manifest Maker.

For detailed description see MSDN topic Private Assemblies.

Shared Assemblies

A shared assembly is very much like a private assembly except that it must be signed and it is installed into a system-defined folder. The major difference is that while a private assembly is only available to applications (programs) in the parent directory, a shared assembly is available to all applications in the system. To use a shared assembly, the application manifest must explicitly reference it.

To create a Shared Assembly choose Shared Assembly build type in the Project Properties dialog in Manifest Maker.

See Building Shared Assemblies for more details on this topic.

For detailed description see MSDN topic Shared Assemblies.

CLR Class Win32 Manifest

Windows supports accessing CLR (.Net) objects using win32 side-by-side technology. This requires a win32 manifest for the CLR class.

To create a win32 manifests for CLR classes choose CLR (.Net) Class Win32 Manifests build type in the Project Properties dialog in Manifest Maker.

See Accessing .Net (CLR Managed) Classes from Win32 Applications for more details on this topic.